Now on View- Turning the Wheel: Chogyam Trungpa Brings the Dharma to the West

"The IT Fan" by Robert del Tredici Don’t miss this exhibition of remarkable photographs by photographer and artist Robert del Tredici. Turning the Wheel: Chogyam Trungpa Brings the Dharma to the West, del Tredici’s collection of photographs taken in the 1970s and early 1980s, will be on view in the West Shrine Room through Friday, October 26.

Mr. del Tredici is offering prints of his photographs for sale, and he has generously offered to donate 15 percent of the sales of his prints to the Shambhala Meditation Center of Denver. To learn more, look for purchase forms in the exhibition space, or contact Lokken Liane at [email protected]

I aim for the fleeting glance, the energy that flies from the eye and goes outward and in. There is hardly more than half a second to catch it.

At the Rocky Mountain Dharma Center Trungpa told me:

There is no need to corkscrew reality with complex and clever compositions. Don’t be afraid to just shoot normal.

And in a Vermont seminar on Milarepa he said:

Magic is the result of being direct, not like a needle piercing with precision, but like a stone-age knife cutting through burlap by crushing the threads.

I took these photos in Vermont and Colorado throughout the early 1970s and early 1980s. They document a heartfelt, hopeful, fearful time impacted by dharma, vibrant with emptiness, and rife with surprise.

Robert Del Tredici

ABOUT THE ARTIST:

Robert Del Tredici is an artist and photographer who began his career in the 1960’s illustrating Moby-Dick.

He studied with Chogyam Trungpa in Vermont and Boulder from the early 1970‘s to the early 1980s.

He began photographing the nuclear age in 1979 with the accident at Three Mile Island.

He has come to Denver to install two exhibits: the work of a group he founded, The Atomic Photographers Guild,

at the Rocky Flats Cold War Museum in Arvada; and his dharma portraits, Turning the Wheel, at the Shambhala Meditation Center of Denver.

Robert lives in Montreal where he teaches the Art of Animated Film, documents the Canadian nuclear industry,

and is chauffeur to his son Felix, 21, who plays the bass trombone.